All The Things You Need To Know Regarding Bunions

posted on 17 Jun 2015 17:21 by gleamingprogres58
Overview
Bunions Hard Skin Even though bunions are a common foot condition, they are probably the one with the most misconceptions. Many people suffer unnecessarily with the pain of bunions for years before seeking treatment out of fear about the ?surgery?. The good news is that most bunion pain can be resolved without surgery.

Causes
There is no single cause of hallux valgus. It most commonly runs in families but may skip generations. High heel, pointed toe shoes are not the primary cause of the hallux valgus but they do cause it to be painful. Pressure from shoes may cause bunions, corns and calluses to develop where there is hallux valgus deformity.

Symptoms
The dominant symptom of a bunion is a big bulging bump on the inside of the base of the big toe. Other symptoms include swelling, soreness and redness around the big toe joint, a tough callus at the bottom of the big toe and persistent or intermittent pain.

Diagnosis
Most patients are diagnosed to have bunions from clinical history and examination. However, in some cases, X-rays will be performed to determine the extent of damage to the joint. Furthermore, it will enable the treating doctor to decide on the best course of management of the patient.

Non Surgical Treatment
Depending on how many of the causative factors are true, a series of exercises to ensure correct alignment and stability of the lower limb should be implemented. Supportive foot wear with correct width and arch support can provide relief -shoes such as ballet flats, thongs (flip flops) and Ugg boots (or slippers) should be avoided. Mobilization of the mid foot to help re-align the toe correctly, and then taping and padding in the shoe to keep the toe in alignment. Taping to help draw the 1st metatarsal back in towards the second and correct any rotation and drop of the 1st metatarsal. Foam padding shaped like a donut to off load the pressure on the outside of the big toe. Bunions Callous

Surgical Treatment
Sometimes a screw is placed in the foot to hold a bone in a corrected position, other times a pin, wire or plate is chosen. There are even absorbable pins and screws, which are used for some patients. In British Columbia, pins seem to be used most frequently, as they're easier to insert and less expensive. They are typically--but not always--removed at some point in the healing process. But as a general rule, Dr. Schumacher prefers to use screws whenever possible, as they offer some advantages over pins. First, using screws allows you to close over the wound completely, without leaving a pin sticking out of the foot. That allows for a lower infection rate, it allows you to get your foot wet more quickly following the surgery, and it usually allows for a quicker return to normal shoes. Second, they're more stable than pins and wires. Stability allows for faster, more uneventful, bone healing. Third, they usually don't need to be removed down the road, so there's one less procedure involved.

Prevention
The best way to reduce your chances of developing a bunion is to wear shoes that fit properly. Any shoe that is too tight or too high will force your toes together and may cause the condition to develop. Shoes need to be wide enough, so they aren't rubbing against the joint, and preferably made of leather. Avoid shoes with a lot elaborate stitching at the front, as this can also cause irritation. Heels should be no more than three to four inches and you should only wear them occasionally. Court shoes should seldomly be worn, as they do not give the foot any support. Be honest with yourself, you know if your shoes aren't fitting you comfortably. Do something about it, or you will suffer for your vanity.
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